Community Wildfire Risk Assessment

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What do we wish to accomplish through the Community Wildfire Risk Assessment (CWRA)?

Project story map

The Community Wildfire Preparedness Plan (CWPP), adopted in 2021, provides a baseline for Park City’s wildfire ‘Preparedness, Planning and Mitigation’ efforts. Planning and mitigation action items contemplated in the CWPP, identify the need to complete a comprehensive analysis of community resources and locations at an elevated risk of a wildfire.

The ‘Community Wildfire Risk Assessment’ provides the ‘Plan’ in which the following goals may be achieved:

  • Resource Identification: Significant data collection, ground proofing and mapping environmental, economic, and social resources.
  • Prioritized Mitigation Efforts: Fire behavior analysis and identification of high- risk locations. Areas will be prioritized in an effort to plan mitigation and funding accordingly. The Plan will allow a baseline in which ordinances may incentivize property owners to address high risk areas in a proactive timeframe.
  • Federal and State Grant Support: The Plan will be conducted within the framework of the National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy (NCWFMS), which is applicable for future State or Federal grant applications.
  • Community Engagement and Information: The Plan provides information and best practices for HOAs and residents.

Development of the Plan and analysis of information will continue throughout the Fall and Winter, with an anticipated adoption of the Plan in spring of 2023.

Learn more:

What do we wish to accomplish through the Community Wildfire Risk Assessment (CWRA)?

Project story map

The Community Wildfire Preparedness Plan (CWPP), adopted in 2021, provides a baseline for Park City’s wildfire ‘Preparedness, Planning and Mitigation’ efforts. Planning and mitigation action items contemplated in the CWPP, identify the need to complete a comprehensive analysis of community resources and locations at an elevated risk of a wildfire.

The ‘Community Wildfire Risk Assessment’ provides the ‘Plan’ in which the following goals may be achieved:

  • Resource Identification: Significant data collection, ground proofing and mapping environmental, economic, and social resources.
  • Prioritized Mitigation Efforts: Fire behavior analysis and identification of high- risk locations. Areas will be prioritized in an effort to plan mitigation and funding accordingly. The Plan will allow a baseline in which ordinances may incentivize property owners to address high risk areas in a proactive timeframe.
  • Federal and State Grant Support: The Plan will be conducted within the framework of the National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy (NCWFMS), which is applicable for future State or Federal grant applications.
  • Community Engagement and Information: The Plan provides information and best practices for HOAs and residents.

Development of the Plan and analysis of information will continue throughout the Fall and Winter, with an anticipated adoption of the Plan in spring of 2023.

Learn more:

Questions and Project Comments

Have questions or suggestions regarding the Community Wildfire Risk Assessment? Share them here.

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    What is the plan for fire mitigation on city owned land such as the trail heading south from the top of Prospect Ave in old town. There is a massive pine forest in steep terrain that threatens old town should it catch fire. Lots of dead fall and overcrowded tree growth.

    Kim asked 2 months ago

    This area has been identified for mitigation work and a contract has been awarded. We are currently trying to schedule the work for either late Fall or early spring.

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    Knowing that the ongoing risk of wildfires is increasing each year, what are some of the things that we will do to protect Park City and the towns in around Summit County?

    Chris asked 2 months ago

    We will be finalizing the CWRA in the spring, which is intended to outline and prioritize different treatment areas. Further, additional funding programs and possible ordinances are likely to be recommended through the adoption. 

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    Hi, I heard Heinrich's interview on the radio. I would like to show community interest. Is there something I should do other than post this? I think wildfire mitigation is CRITICAL.

    John Fry asked 2 months ago

    Thank you, John, for conveying interest in this project. Please send an email to wildfire@parkcity.org and we will add you to our distribution list. Additionally, if you haven't already, we encourage you to take the survey on this Engage page and to share it with others.

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    Has an environmental study been done to determine the levels of Lead & Arsenic released from the trees when they are chopped down are safe and within EPA guidelines? This study and test should be done by a 3rd party entity not related to the persons and organizations that have been hired to do this tree removal.

    Carol Anne Kret asked 4 months ago

    Carol, thank you for your interest in Park City’s community forestry and wildfire mitigation discussions. While this website is dedicated to the Community Wildfire Risk Assessment (CWRA) and different from the Treasure Hill project, we wanted to take the opportunity to answer your questions.  

    You can find information associated with the Treasure Hill project and Management Plan via this link: https://www.parkcity.org/departments/trails-open-space/wildfire-mitigation/current-programs. This plan outlines the goals, objectives, and prescriptions associated with the project.

    The City relies on subject experts to provide recommendations associated with our project goals and implement projects through recognized standards and best practices. The City is open to differing viewpoints and additional comments in a productive manner. Specifically, we have requested the consultants look into concerns you have raised related to best practices and possible health risks. We are also consulting with the City’s Environmental Regulatory Manager.

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    Here’s my Letter to the Editor of Park Record with my questions on this matter: We speak for the Trees, in the name of Science” I am lucky enough to live in Park City for almost 30 years and truly blessed to live & hike regularly in Old Town. For the past several weeks I’ve witnessed the remains of chopped down trees & stumps along the Sweeney Switchback’s. So, I’ve inquired with The City to learn about why this taking place. I am told this is being done in the name of Forest Management and employs the tenants of Cohesive Wildland Fire Management a.k.a, Forest Clearing. I was given a DRAFT Treasure Hill Forest Management Plan for Public Comment. Have you seen this? Meanwhile, independent scientists are publishing reports showing fires spread slower through uncut forest areas due to higher levels of moisture and nutrients in the soil. It’s worth noting wildfires that leveled towns in California and Oregon followed “forest thinning” efforts and were more aggressive in thinned areas. And after this year’s New Mexico fires the forestry service itself had acknowledged they just didn’t understand effects of climate change and fire. Scary, right? Scientists are also publishing on the role of forests in removing and storing toxins, such as arsenic and lead, which are released into air, water, and soil when areas are cut or burned. In towns such as ours, legacy mining towns, the forest is keeping us safe from the toxic history of mining. Should the area be burned, the entire town could have hazardous air. Do we want this risk? This week we hear chainsaws as they gnaw away tree after tree. I asked the City if anyone has considered the effects this tree cutting would have on our air quality, since we all know we have high levels of lead and arsenic that is known in our soils and therefore our forests. No answers from anyone at the City. Speaking for the Trees and for my tax dollars along with my Treasure Hill bond monies, I know I would certainly appreciate an answer from the City that they have or will soon be hiring credible 3rd party scientists to do an in-depth scientific analysis of the soils & land well before any more trees are chopped down, or a prescribed burn or worse. Please. Sincerely, Carol Anne Kret

    Carol Anne Kret asked 4 months ago

    Carol, thank you for your interest in Park City’s community forestry and wildfire mitigation discussions. While this website is dedicated to the Community Wildfire Risk Assessment (CWRA) and different from the Treasure Hill project, we wanted to take the opportunity to answer your questions.  

    You can find information associated with the Treasure Hill project and Management Plan via this link: https://www.parkcity.org/departments/trails-open-space/wildfire-mitigation/current-programs. This plan outlines the goals, objectives, and prescriptions associated with the project.

    The City relies on subject experts to provide recommendations associated with our project goals and implement projects through recognized standards and best practices. The City is open to differing viewpoints and additional comments in a productive manner. Specifically, we have requested the consultants look into concerns you have raised related to best practices and possible health risks. We are also consulting with the City’s Environmental Regulatory Manager.

Page last updated: 20 Sep 2022, 12:21 PM