Park City Soils Repository Overview

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Updated May 10, 2021

We’ve received a lot of inquiries lately about our plans for a Park City Soils Management Facility. This Engage Park City page will be our central landing spot for information and updates so that we can respond to questions that come up and provide clear answers. As a follow-up to information posted recently, check out this comprehensive project summary prepared by the project team. And as always, if there’s something you think we’ve missed or should clarify further, please don’t hesitate to contact us either via this EngagePC page or any other way you like.

CAPITAL PROJECT SUMMARY: The Park City Bevill Waste Soils Management Facility


Updated May 10, 2021

We’ve received a lot of inquiries lately about our plans for a Park City Soils Management Facility. This Engage Park City page will be our central landing spot for information and updates so that we can respond to questions that come up and provide clear answers. As a follow-up to information posted recently, check out this comprehensive project summary prepared by the project team. And as always, if there’s something you think we’ve missed or should clarify further, please don’t hesitate to contact us either via this EngagePC page or any other way you like.

CAPITAL PROJECT SUMMARY: The Park City Bevill Waste Soils Management Facility


Questions and comments

Questions and comments on the Park City Soils Repository are welcome below. We will respond to questions within 24 hours. 

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    Would the City be interested in a dedicated Hazmat transportation company? We would handle all loading, transportation, and proper disposal.

    Brian asked 7 days ago

    Any soils transporting services would be included as part of an overall contract for construction services for each future construction project.

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    The "Preliminary Location Screening Analysis" that accompanied the State UDEQ permit states the Gordo site (the site in question) is not located within 1,000 ft of a "national, state, county or city park, monument or recreation area" (which is a requirement of siting / locating this kind of facility per the Analysis). This is clearly incorrect in that the Gordo site is entirely surrounded by land zoned by PC as "Recreation(al) Open Space." How does the proposed Gordo site comply with the state regulations as far as location and proximity to a well-loved and well-used recreational area?

    FloridaMan asked 5 days ago

    For the purposes of this permit application, recreation areas and parks include developed facilities such as ice rink buildings and restrooms. Surface improvements like trails, sidewalks, and fences were not included. The preliminary site assessment determined that the Park City Sports Complex at Quinn’s Junction is 1,600 feet from the Soils Repository, and other facilities such as the dog park and ice arena are further away.

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    BUILD A BERM!!! Use the soil to Build a Berm, landscape and beautify the 248 corridor into Park City. Both sides of Kearns from Wyatt Earp to Comstock, Plant more trees , Zero scape the grass to save water. block sound for prospector neighborhood, protect children from traffic and noise at treasure mountain middle school and beautify the corridor entry into Park City. Take something negative and turn it into a positive!!!!

    Sandra Bergland asked 9 days ago

    Thank you for your comment.

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    If I were plotting to sabotage the Park City Arts and Culture District I could not come up with a more effective scheme than hanging this toxic waste albatross around it's neck. It's one thing that Park City tries to emulate all things Aspen, but why aspire to be more like Grantsville?

    martinjedlicka asked 8 days ago

    Thank you for sharing your comment.

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    nice clear explanation of our situation but it nonetheless leaves us with too much of just about everything not nice - people, cars, congestion, money, developers - we still have a pretty fine town though - too pretty to wreck completely.

    nick asked 11 days ago

    Thank you for your comment.

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    Based on previous excavation of soils within the Soils Ordinance Boundary what is the upper and lower end estimates of soils in cubic yards that will need to be placed in this Subtitle D- Class I facility for build out of the currently named Arts and Culture District?

    eebragg asked 10 days ago

    The upper estimate would be 60,000 cubic yards, the lower estimate would be 40,000 cubic yards.

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    Prior it it being capped, will wind be an issue? If the answer is to frequently spray with water can our drought handle this increased demand?

    Janna asked 11 days ago

    Park City will be responsible for operating the landfill consistent with requirements of the landfill permit, and as governed by a plan of operations that among many things has requirements for dust and blowing winds. Specifically, the application section 3.8.4 (p.16) notes a Control plan for Fugitive Dust:


    Further, section 3.6 of the Operations plan also notes a weather contingency plan calling for closure of the landfull during periods of inclement weather (such as high winds, etc.) that would make operations dangerous.



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    This seems really close to residential neighborhoods. Isnt it going to create more loud truck noise and traffic? What about water seepage and water tables?

    Nicsalinas asked 12 days ago

    The nearest residences are at Park City Heights, which is about 1/3 of a mile away as the crow flies and is separated by SR248 and the City’s Water Treatment Plant.

    There will be intermittent truck traffic – during normal business hours – along SR248 between Bonanza Park and the Gordo site.  But because this is a by appointment-only facility and only for City construction and private homeowners, it shouldn’t generate noticeable traffic impacts.

    The facility will be lined with a composite liner system to prevent seepage and we’ll be monitoring test wells to ensure that no leakage occurs. The City elected to install this more robust liner system because it is a higher standard of care than is found at industrial landfills.

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    I am writing this email as a concerned resident of Park City. The current proposed permit for “Quinns Junction”, class one landfill at the “Gordo” property I find alarming. The location of this could not be at a more worse location. Bike Trails, hiking, cross country skiing, snow shoeing etc. are at or close to this location. While there is always push back because of :”not in my back yard”, this location of the class one landfill needs and should be reconsidered given the density of the population and the recreational use of the land. The back that bond money is been used to purchase some of this land and it is currently zoned for recreational use, I find it not just concerning but alarming that anybody would consider locating a class one landfill on this site. There has to be less populated areas to locate such a site that would not have the potential for adverse outcomes regarding the risk to residents health. If history has shown us anything, locating sites that pose a potential high risk to humans, and wildlife, despite the engineering and remediation efforts that have taken place are not sound decisions. You only have to look at Florida and the negative outcome to local residents and wildlife to see that engineer failed to get it right. There are many other instances like this to mention. The comments period and reconsideration of this site is in order!! Some questions that need to be and should be answered and are not limited to the following: How will the system prevent any impact to ground water? The answer can not be the basic and current engineering as it has been shown that they fail. There should be a belt and suspenders approach here as if the “main” system fails there are two back ups for safety. Yes it would cost more, but what price do you put on failures in this space and its impact to the environment? Why were public funds used this process? I urge you to extend the comment period so residents like me, can become better informed of this critical issue and what is the right decision for the Park City and its impacted residents. Regards, Ed Schreiber

    Ed asked 13 days ago

    Thanks for your questions and comments. We've organized the answers below...

    Bike Trails, hiking, cross country skiing, snow shoeing, etc. are at or close to this location.

    • True – and true for where soils are stored or exposed throughout Park City. Trails actually crisscross remediated sites in some places and go right next to other repositories (at PC Heights and Richardson Flat, for instance).  


    The back that bond money is been used to purchase some of this land and it is currently zoned for recreational use, I find it not just concerning but alarming that anybody would consider locating a class one landfill on this site.

    • Open space bond funds were used to purchase a couple of parcels in this area, but not for the parcels where the repository would be located.


    There has to be less populated areas to locate such a site that would not have the potential for adverse outcomes regarding the risk to residents' health.

    • The Utah DEQ’s permitting process evaluates the potential health risks, risks to wildlife, water resources, etc. There is no indication that this facility as proposed impact those factors. This is considered a non-hazardous facility, hence the Subtitle D classification. While there are undoubtedly other locations further away from Park City, this location rose to the top in part because it is in town but not close to residential or commercial areas – and soils are stored there currently.


    How will the system prevent any impact to ground water?

    • The facility will be lined with a composite lining system (upper liner of HDPE and secondary liner of a geosynthetic clay (GCL))to prevent seepage and we’ll be monitoring test wells to ensure that no leakage occurs. This is a higher standard of care than is found at industrial landfills that would typically be used to store this type of material. We agree with the concept of a belt-and-suspenders approach, which is why we are going with the composite liner system rather than a less robust liner system typically found in the industrial landfills (Class III Landfills).


    Why were public funds used this process?

    • The land with the soils that need to be stored are publicly-owned land, except for the anticipated private homeowner parcels that may also use this facility (but would constitute a tiny fraction of the soils stored here). This facility is not for the use of private development – it is only to be used for City projects and a small portion for private homeowners from within the Soils Ordinance Boundary.
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    Is it still true that residents only have until the end of today to submit comments/concerns on the proposal?

    L.A.W. asked 13 days ago

    That was true for the DEQ permit application, which has a specific comment period as required by state law. Anyone can provide comments and questions to us at the City ongoing about this project.