Park City Soils Facility Overview

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Updated May 10, 2021

We’ve received a lot of inquiries lately about our plans for a Park City Soils Management Facility. This Engage Park City page will be our central landing spot for information and updates so that we can respond to questions that come up and provide clear answers. As a follow-up to information posted recently, check out this comprehensive project summary prepared by the project team. And as always, if there’s something you think we’ve missed or should clarify further, please don’t hesitate to contact us either via this EngagePC page or any other way you like.

CAPITAL PROJECT SUMMARY: The Park City Bevill Waste Soils Management Facility


Updated May 10, 2021

We’ve received a lot of inquiries lately about our plans for a Park City Soils Management Facility. This Engage Park City page will be our central landing spot for information and updates so that we can respond to questions that come up and provide clear answers. As a follow-up to information posted recently, check out this comprehensive project summary prepared by the project team. And as always, if there’s something you think we’ve missed or should clarify further, please don’t hesitate to contact us either via this EngagePC page or any other way you like.

CAPITAL PROJECT SUMMARY: The Park City Bevill Waste Soils Management Facility


Questions and comments

Questions and comments on the Park City Soils Repository are welcome below. This page is monitored daily, and we will do our best to respond to questions promptly. 

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    Is the federal penitentiary fencing permanent? What a beautiful entry to the city. Toxic dumps and razor wire fencing. Is this a traffic mitigation strategy? Genius

    Brian asked 19 days ago

    Thank you for your feedback.

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    Why not consider selling the site to pay for soil to be removed to previously and properly developed facility outside Park City? Perhaps a member of the community would like to sponsor a park or recreational site for our community's benefit. Contaminating valuable Park City land that is essentially part of Quinn's Junction during a land rush in a town that is supposedly environmentally consious seems counterproductive to Park City's values. Additionally not using a previously built toxic waste site results in lost revenue for the community that already built a waste site to handle contaminated soils. Keep Park City land environmentally safe for our kids and for our community.

    ParkCity90 asked 23 days ago

    The estimated cost to haul the soils currently on the Gordo site along with future, projected projects (120,000 CY) is $21M.

    The City used Richardson Flat soil repository for mine impacted soils generated within the soils ordinance boundary for many years, however that facility became unavailable to City projects in 2010. The City then attempted to negotiate a 3 party agreement with the EPA and Mines Company to find a permanent storage facility in the region. When this process failed, the City attempted to further negotiate to move the temporary soils at Gordo to Richardson Flat, but ultimately failed. Because we could not get cooperation from the party responsible for creating the mine soils and the government entity responsible for regulating it, the city faced the reality of locating a repository on its own property.


     

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    Can you put this proposal to a community vote? This impacts many and not just for this project, because what’s on the table, acts as a guideline for future mitigation and toxic clean up. We need to have a plan that this community understands and supports for this projects and future initiatives.

    KimD asked 23 days ago

    There is no plan at this time to submit this project to a ballot measure.  

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    When answering the question of how much money might be saved by implementing the Gordo soils project, PCMC has stated: "For the soils located at the Arts and Culture District site alone, the savings in 2021 would be close to $7.3M. For Arts and Culture soils, plus the current Gordo soils, plus future City projects in the pipeline, the savings are estimated to be approximately $17.9M." This answer implies that the A&C District project would be 40% of the potential savings. What other already planned projects make up the 60% balance of the savings? Can you provide a list of these projects, the savings allocated to each and the timing of them? Thank you. Tim Govin

    TPG asked 23 days ago

    The cost to haul one CY of soil to Clean Harbors is $175/CY.Therefore, the cost to haul soils to Clean Harbors: 

    1. $6.125M -  35,000 CY; Existing (Bonanza and Comstock tunnels, Bus Barn Iron Horse; 

    1. $10.5M - 60,000 CY; Art & Culture site 

    1. $4.375M - 25,000 CY; Future City projects& Residential, including: 

    1. Homestake Trail – 1,450 CY 

    1. Munchkin Road – 1,200 CY 

    1. Homestake Housing – 2,000 CY 

    1. Public Utilities (Homestake water line) - 1,000 CY 

    1. City Park Improvements – 500 CY 

    1. Repository & Recycle Utah Utilities – 1,200 CY 

    1. Park Avenue – 400 CY 

    1. Prospector Residential – 5,000 CY 

    1. Future City Projects – 12,250. 

    Cost to construct and haul soils to Gordo = $3.54M$21M-$3.5M=$17.5M. 

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    As you drive into Park City now with the mountains as a backdrop along Kearney the building of the repository has started and we now see digging equipment in the picture, which was picture perfect and now is a construction eyesore. My question is what can we do about this? The same for Richardson Flat Road dirt piles in such an area of beauty can we not come up with a plan to make this less of an eyesore?

    Kate Britton asked 23 days ago

    The City has not started to build a repository yet at Gordo. What you’re seeing now is the Water Department’s temporary storing of clay that is to be used for lining the golf course ponds. This site has been used for staging materials and storage by the City’s Public Utilities and Public Works Departments for many years,. The future repository when closed will be capped and the entire site and project will be revegetated with natural, soil berms across the site, bringing back its natural appearance.   

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    Why a landfill near a residential area?

    Jackson asked 23 days ago

    Nearly the entire Silver Creek corridor contains mine impacted soils. There are numerous remediation efforts from the top of Daly Canyon through Richardson Flats to I-80, including a repository in PC Heights , which holds over 68,000 CY of soils on 5.3 acres. Moving soils within the soils ordinance boundary and away from our drinking water source protection zones to a lined and capped facility is an improvement that benefits the entire community. 

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    What expertise and experience does Mike McComb (Park City's emergency manager) have with hazardous wastes and hazardous waste disposal? Thank you, Rich Wyman

    Rich asked 23 days ago

    Of note, the Department of Environmental Quality/Division of Waste Management and Radiation Control has responsibility for regulating the generation, treatment, storage, and disposal of contaminated soil in Utah.  The Park City Emergency Manager’s role and responsibilities do not include environmental cleanup issues.  In the event of an incident involving hazardous waste/disposal, however, the Emergency Manager would be involved in helping coordinate a unified response and recovery efforts, as well as the prevention/mitigation and preparedness phases of emergency management.  

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    The more questions PCMC answers, the more questions I have. Since UDEQ R 315-310-4 (2) (viii) requires a "background ground and surface water quality assessment and identification of impacts of the existing facility upon ground and surface waters from landfill leachate discharges;" I don't see how PCMC can proceed without conducting background ground and surface water quality assessments? Also, shouldn't all the information PMCM will require for a Building Permit be part of the UDEQ Landfill application? Finally, who will be the entity issuing insurance for this Facility? Thank You

    Fred asked 23 days ago

    PCMC’s consulting team includes Bill Loughlin a hydrogeologist. Bill’s team has conducted thorough ground and surface water quality assessments. Those findings and results can be found as part of our UDEQ application. If you would like to set up a time to individually discuss with staff and our consulting team, please contact Jonathan at 435.640.3723 or by email: jweidenhamer@parkcity.org. The City’s use and building permitting will occur independently from and subsequent to the UDEQ  process. The insurance question will be addressed if and when any decision to proceed with the project occurs as part of the City’s overall insurance and risk management strategy.

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    Now that COVID rules are easing, I'd suggest you host an in-person but safe tour of the ACD and Gordo sites for the public. The discussion is likely to become much more specific and rational when people actually touch the sites involved, rather than just think about them abstractly. And do it soon.

    furthertofly asked 23 days ago

    The A&C and Gordo properties are currently being used for construction staging.  City staff will arrange for group site tours of these properties as part of the public engagement process. Stay tuned for details.

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    Hello, Why is Park City storing these tailing, when the world is going through a Rare Earth Mineral shortage? These tailings should be sold to buyers of arsenic, lead and whatever else is in those tailings. Article from ThermoFisher Scientific titled - “From Tailings to Treasure? A New Mother Lode” “…findings from the U.S. Geological Survey indicating that discarded mine tailings may yield significant amounts of rare earth elements; modern extraction techniques would now permit their recovery. This is good news because rare earth elements, which are extremely difficult and costly to mine, are critical components in consumer electronics such as televisions, computers, cameras, and mobile phones, as well as catalytic converters and metal alloys.” Another article from the World Economic Forum - “Landfill mining: is this the next big thing in recycling?” “…by combining landfill remediation with resource recovery of the excavated waste, the net cost of the remediation activity can be drastically reduced. How? By generating recyclable goods and energy (carriers), all of which can provide much-needed revenue to counterbalance the cost of remediation. In fact, if landfill mining followed the principles of the “enhanced landfill mining” approach, where higher added value outputs are targeted, the net economic balance of the combined remediation-landfill mining activity can even become positive, which is especially the case for larger landfills where economies of scale become relevant. As such, remediation combined with enhanced landfill mining can generate an income for public waste agencies, and this can then be used to cover the costs of remediating and mining smaller, less economic landfills that pose short-term environmental and health risks.” Make Park City money and get rid of the problem at the same time! Thank you, Ken Lott

    Ken L asked 23 days ago

    Thanks for this information.