Help Park City Redesign Park Avenue

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Your Street Should Align with Your Values

Park City is rolling out a series of neighborhood and streetscape improvements that aim to enhance and reimagine the traditional roll of streets and roads in our mountain town. For several decades, cities and towns have prioritized vehicle through-put and parking vehicle storage above all else – streets were designed to park our cars and get us from point a. to point b. quickly.

Park City’s values have evolved over time. The recent Community Visioning process indicated that residents support a reprioritization of our long held values. There is a new desire to create neighborhood-centric streetscapes that elevate pedestrian safety and walkability, increase bicycle and public transit access, and offer a more welcoming environment by way of public art elements, creative crosswalk designs, and a host of natural elements (plants, flowers, trees, etc.).

Park Avenue, from the Harvest restaurant to Jans and Cole Sport, has long been considered by the City for a major street reconstruction project. Street reconstruction is expensive and you live with the results for decades. So now is the time to get involved, help us rethink Park Avenue and create an environment that better aligns with the values of your neighborhood!

This fall, 2020, City Council is considering a pilot improvement program to test out new street ideas and concepts. Please review the information below, take the survey to help us prioritize your values, and express your vision and desired outcomes for the future of Park Avenue.

Take the Survey

Alternative 1A: Uphill (Southbound) Bike Lane between Traffic Flow and Parking


Pros:

  • Designated 6 ft. bike lane for uphill (southbound) bicyclists.
  • Parking remains on west side of the street.
  • No center line – allows flexibility for motorists to safely shift within roadway to pass cyclists.
  • Northbound bikes (traveling downhill) share a lane with vehicles.
  • Eliminating some parking increases space and safety for bicycles.

Cons:

  • Parking eliminated on east side of street (~113 parking spots). Remaining parking becomes a residential permit zone with shared parking (residential permits and time limited spots) between 9th and 11th Streets.
  • Driver car doors open into bike lane.
  • No center line (concern to some).

Alternative 1B: Uphill (Southbound) Bike Lane between Parking and Sidewalk


Pros:

  • Designated bike lane for uphill (southbound) bicyclists.
  • Parking remains on west side of street.
  • No center line – allows flexibility for motorists to safely shift within roadway to pass cyclists.
  • Northbound bikes (traveling downhill) share lane with vehicles.
  • Eliminating some parking increases space and safety for bicycles.

Cons:

  • Parking eliminated on east side of street (~113 parking spots). Remaining parking becomes a residential permit zone with shared parking (residential permits and time limited spots) between 9th and 11th Streets.
  • Narrower bike lane (4 ft.) than aforementioned option.
  • Bikes riding adjacent to parked cars could be hidden and conflict with vehicles turning into driveways.
  • Passenger car doors will extend into bike lane.
  • No center line (concern to some).

Alternative 2: Two-Way Designated Bike Lane (Cycle Track)

Pros:

  • Two-way designated bike lanes on east side of street.
  • Parking remains on west side of street.
  • No center line stripe – allows flexibility for motorists to safely shift within roadway to pass cyclists.
  • Eliminating some parking increases space and safety for bicycles.

Cons:

  • Parking eliminated on east side of street (~113 parking spots). Remaining parking becomes a residential permit zone with shared parking (residential permits and time limited spots) between 9th and 11th Streets.
  • Narrow bike lane (recommended two-way bike lane is 12’ wide).
  • Narrow parking area (consistent with existing conditions).
  • No center line (concern to some).
  • Narrow (10’) vehicle lanes. (Width of Park City buses is 10’ mirror-to-mirror).
  • In front of Library, northbound bikes may use sidewalk to get around the two Library bus stops.

    Alternative 3: Separated Bike Lanes in Each Direction

Pros:

  • One standard-width bike lane in each direction next to sidewalk.
  • Two 11’ vehicle lanes with striped centerline.
  • Eliminates all parking on both sides of street, increasing space and safety for bicycles.

Cons:

  • Eliminates all parking on both sides of street (~193 spaces lost).

Alternative 4: Status Quo


Pros:

  • Predictable and maintains status quo.
  • No loss in parking spaces. All parking becomes a residential permit zone with shared parking (residential permits and time limited spots) between 9th and 11th Streets.

Cons:

  • Doesn’t reflect new community values.
  • Pedestrian, bike, and transit enhancements not implemented.



Take the Survey


Who’s listening?

Michelle Downard, Resident Advocate

michelle.downard@parkcity.org | 435.615.5109

Alexis Verson, Senior Transportation Planner

alexis.verson@parkcity.org | 435.615.5317


Lynn Ware Peek, Community Liaison

lynn.ware-peek@parkcity.org | 435.615.5201

Your Street Should Align with Your Values

Park City is rolling out a series of neighborhood and streetscape improvements that aim to enhance and reimagine the traditional roll of streets and roads in our mountain town. For several decades, cities and towns have prioritized vehicle through-put and parking vehicle storage above all else – streets were designed to park our cars and get us from point a. to point b. quickly.

Park City’s values have evolved over time. The recent Community Visioning process indicated that residents support a reprioritization of our long held values. There is a new desire to create neighborhood-centric streetscapes that elevate pedestrian safety and walkability, increase bicycle and public transit access, and offer a more welcoming environment by way of public art elements, creative crosswalk designs, and a host of natural elements (plants, flowers, trees, etc.).

Park Avenue, from the Harvest restaurant to Jans and Cole Sport, has long been considered by the City for a major street reconstruction project. Street reconstruction is expensive and you live with the results for decades. So now is the time to get involved, help us rethink Park Avenue and create an environment that better aligns with the values of your neighborhood!

This fall, 2020, City Council is considering a pilot improvement program to test out new street ideas and concepts. Please review the information below, take the survey to help us prioritize your values, and express your vision and desired outcomes for the future of Park Avenue.

Take the Survey

Alternative 1A: Uphill (Southbound) Bike Lane between Traffic Flow and Parking


Pros:

  • Designated 6 ft. bike lane for uphill (southbound) bicyclists.
  • Parking remains on west side of the street.
  • No center line – allows flexibility for motorists to safely shift within roadway to pass cyclists.
  • Northbound bikes (traveling downhill) share a lane with vehicles.
  • Eliminating some parking increases space and safety for bicycles.

Cons:

  • Parking eliminated on east side of street (~113 parking spots). Remaining parking becomes a residential permit zone with shared parking (residential permits and time limited spots) between 9th and 11th Streets.
  • Driver car doors open into bike lane.
  • No center line (concern to some).

Alternative 1B: Uphill (Southbound) Bike Lane between Parking and Sidewalk


Pros:

  • Designated bike lane for uphill (southbound) bicyclists.
  • Parking remains on west side of street.
  • No center line – allows flexibility for motorists to safely shift within roadway to pass cyclists.
  • Northbound bikes (traveling downhill) share lane with vehicles.
  • Eliminating some parking increases space and safety for bicycles.

Cons:

  • Parking eliminated on east side of street (~113 parking spots). Remaining parking becomes a residential permit zone with shared parking (residential permits and time limited spots) between 9th and 11th Streets.
  • Narrower bike lane (4 ft.) than aforementioned option.
  • Bikes riding adjacent to parked cars could be hidden and conflict with vehicles turning into driveways.
  • Passenger car doors will extend into bike lane.
  • No center line (concern to some).

Alternative 2: Two-Way Designated Bike Lane (Cycle Track)

Pros:

  • Two-way designated bike lanes on east side of street.
  • Parking remains on west side of street.
  • No center line stripe – allows flexibility for motorists to safely shift within roadway to pass cyclists.
  • Eliminating some parking increases space and safety for bicycles.

Cons:

  • Parking eliminated on east side of street (~113 parking spots). Remaining parking becomes a residential permit zone with shared parking (residential permits and time limited spots) between 9th and 11th Streets.
  • Narrow bike lane (recommended two-way bike lane is 12’ wide).
  • Narrow parking area (consistent with existing conditions).
  • No center line (concern to some).
  • Narrow (10’) vehicle lanes. (Width of Park City buses is 10’ mirror-to-mirror).
  • In front of Library, northbound bikes may use sidewalk to get around the two Library bus stops.

    Alternative 3: Separated Bike Lanes in Each Direction

Pros:

  • One standard-width bike lane in each direction next to sidewalk.
  • Two 11’ vehicle lanes with striped centerline.
  • Eliminates all parking on both sides of street, increasing space and safety for bicycles.

Cons:

  • Eliminates all parking on both sides of street (~193 spaces lost).

Alternative 4: Status Quo


Pros:

  • Predictable and maintains status quo.
  • No loss in parking spaces. All parking becomes a residential permit zone with shared parking (residential permits and time limited spots) between 9th and 11th Streets.

Cons:

  • Doesn’t reflect new community values.
  • Pedestrian, bike, and transit enhancements not implemented.



Take the Survey


Who’s listening?

Michelle Downard, Resident Advocate

michelle.downard@parkcity.org | 435.615.5109

Alexis Verson, Senior Transportation Planner

alexis.verson@parkcity.org | 435.615.5317


Lynn Ware Peek, Community Liaison

lynn.ware-peek@parkcity.org | 435.615.5201

Have a question? Please feel free to ask us.

Help Park City Redesign Park Avenue - Q&A

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